Student Opportunities

Graduate Studies

ESRC graduate students collaborate closely with ESRC faculty in pursuit of a Master's degree or a Ph.D. ESRC graduate students are expected to fully engage in ESRC research projects, most of which are funded by grants from federal agencies such as the National Science Foundation, NASA, and the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration. In addition to writing a thesis, ESRC graduate students routinely publish their research findings in high-impact scientific journals.

Students pursing a Master's degree with ERSC faculty mentors have several options. Our Master's students commonly enroll in the graduate program in the Department of Natural Resources and the Environment  or the Department of Earth Sciences. The Department of Natural Resources and the Environment provides degree specializations in Environmental Conservation, Environmental EconomicsForestrySoil and Water Resource Management, and Wildlife and Conservation Biology. The Department of Earth Sciences offers Master of Science degrees in Geology, Hydrology, Oceanography, Ocean Mapping, and Geochemical Systems

Students pursuing a Ph.D. degree with ESRC faculty mentors enroll in the Natural Resources and Earth Systems Science (NRESS) Ph.D. Program (one of the largest Ph.D. program at UNH with approximately 60 Ph.D. students enrolled at any given time) and choose a degree in Natural Resources and Environmental Studies (NRES) or Earth and Environmental Sciences (EES). 

Undergraduate Opportunities

Undergraduate students are engaged in research projects working collaboratively with ESRC graduate students and faculty. If you are interested in enhancing your education by joining an active research project, please peruse our current research projects and contact one of research team members. You can also submit a proposal to the Hamel Center for Undergraduate Research requesting funds to support your research project.  Most of our undergraduate researchers also present their results at the UNH Undergraduate Research Conference.

 

  • Civil and Environmental Engineering Ph.D. '20
    Alumni Spotlight Q & A: Where are you from, Eunsang?  Originally from Bucheon (부천), South Korea. What was your major and who was your advisor? Civil and Environmental Engineering, Ph.D. 2020. I studied surface hydrology and snow remote sensing for enhanced flood prediction, water resources...
    Civil and Environmental Engineering Ph.D. '20
    Alumni Spotlight Q & A: Where are you from, Eunsang?  Originally from Bucheon (부천), South Korea. What was your major and who was your advisor? Civil and Environmental Engineering, Ph.D. 2020. I studied surface hydrology and snow remote sensing for enhanced flood prediction, water resources...
  • Earth Sciences M.S. '10
    Alumni Spotlight Q & A: Where are you from, Claire?  From Keene, New Hampshire. What did you study and who was your advisor? Earth Sciences, M.S. 2010. I studied how to model permafrost and how it could be affected by wildfire. I worked with ...
    Earth Sciences M.S. '10
    Alumni Spotlight Q & A: Where are you from, Claire?  From Keene, New Hampshire. What did you study and who was your advisor? Earth Sciences, M.S. 2010. I studied how to model permafrost and how it could be affected by wildfire. I worked with ...
  • Methane (CH4) Flux Dynamics in Subarctic Peatland Thaw Ponds Using Field and Remote Sensing Techniques
    Sophie's research involves the monitoring of CH4 emissions (focusing on ebullitive flux) from thaw ponds at Stordalen Mire in Northern Sweden. Her goals are to understand how CH4 emissions from these ponds are changing over time and to compare them to those of other sub-ecosystems within the whole...
    Methane (CH4) Flux Dynamics in Subarctic Peatland Thaw Ponds Using Field and Remote Sensing Techniques
    Sophie's research involves the monitoring of CH4 emissions (focusing on ebullitive flux) from thaw ponds at Stordalen Mire in Northern Sweden. Her goals are to understand how CH4 emissions from these ponds are changing over time and to compare them to those of other sub-ecosystems within the whole...
  • Sap Collection and Syrup Production from Trees Other than Maple Trees in Light of Climate Change
    Several genera of deciduous, woody angiosperms (such as Alnus, Carya, Ostrya, and Platanus) are known to produce edible sap, but methods of harvesting the sap and processing the sap into syrup have not been developed; other genera (such as Betula and Juglans) are already commercially important for...
    Sap Collection and Syrup Production from Trees Other than Maple Trees in Light of Climate Change
    Several genera of deciduous, woody angiosperms (such as Alnus, Carya, Ostrya, and Platanus) are known to produce edible sap, but methods of harvesting the sap and processing the sap into syrup have not been developed; other genera (such as Betula and Juglans) are already commercially important for...
  • The Role of Beaver Ponds and Fluvial Wetlands in Aquatic Nitrogen Removal from Headwaters to River Network-scale
    Christopher's research is looking at the role of fluvial wetlands in aquatic nitrogen removal. He is specifically interested in how fluvial wetlands attenuate nitrogen fluxes from upstream urban areas and what part these wetlands have played in mitigating increasing nitrogen inputs associated with...
    The Role of Beaver Ponds and Fluvial Wetlands in Aquatic Nitrogen Removal from Headwaters to River Network-scale
    Christopher's research is looking at the role of fluvial wetlands in aquatic nitrogen removal. He is specifically interested in how fluvial wetlands attenuate nitrogen fluxes from upstream urban areas and what part these wetlands have played in mitigating increasing nitrogen inputs associated with...