Student-Led Research

water satellite technology

OPAL works with graduate students who have conducted research in estuaries and oceans here in New England, but also spanning the globe to South America, the South Pacific, the Atlantic, the Gulf of Mexico, and Antarctica. Compelling issues associated with the ocean's response to climate dynamics and fishing pressures, along with many new inwater and satellite technologies are leading to exciting new opportunities to tailor research in collaboration with OPAL scientists.

Study and research at UNH within both EOS and the UNH School of Marine Science and Ocean Engineering provides students with access to a broad range of Earth system expertise and we work to foster an environment where interdisciplinary approaches to problem solving are encouraged. OPAL faculty teach and advise within the Earth Science and Oceanography programs and we also work with students across a range of disciplines including engineering, mathematics and computer science. 

Meet Opal Students

  • Spatial and Temporal Occurrence of Preformed Nitrate Anomalies in the Subtropical Ocean
    Adam's research involves the use of data from biogeochemical Argo profiling floats to determine the reoccurence, spatial extents, and seasonality of preformed nitrate anomalies in the global subtropical ocean.
    Spatial and Temporal Occurrence of Preformed Nitrate Anomalies in the Subtropical Ocean
    Adam's research involves the use of data from biogeochemical Argo profiling floats to determine the reoccurence, spatial extents, and seasonality of preformed nitrate anomalies in the global subtropical ocean.
  • Investigating the Effect of Glacial-Carved Submarine Troughs on Coastal Circulation
    Patrick's research focuses on submarine canyons located in the continental shelf called troughs. He's investigating the dynamics of how troughs exchange water between shelves and ocean basins to better understand the impacts of ocean circulation patterns. 
    Investigating the Effect of Glacial-Carved Submarine Troughs on Coastal Circulation
    Patrick's research focuses on submarine canyons located in the continental shelf called troughs. He's investigating the dynamics of how troughs exchange water between shelves and ocean basins to better understand the impacts of ocean circulation patterns. 
  • Establishing Pteropods as a Biological Indicator for Ocean Acidification
    Tyler's research focuses on ocean acidification in the waters off the East Coast of the United States. She's trying to establish the relationship between the temporal and spatial distribution of pteropod species to help assess the viability of pteropods for use as a biological indicator for OA. 
    Establishing Pteropods as a Biological Indicator for Ocean Acidification
    Tyler's research focuses on ocean acidification in the waters off the East Coast of the United States. She's trying to establish the relationship between the temporal and spatial distribution of pteropod species to help assess the viability of pteropods for use as a biological indicator for OA. 
  • Examining alkalinity in coastal water and its connection to ocean acidification
    Chris' research details how coastal ocean water buffers inputs of acidity. The acidification of these important ecosystems is projected to increase in the near future due to increasing atmospheric CO2 inputs.
    Examining alkalinity in coastal water and its connection to ocean acidification
    Chris' research details how coastal ocean water buffers inputs of acidity. The acidification of these important ecosystems is projected to increase in the near future due to increasing atmospheric CO2 inputs.
  • Does enzymatic hydrolysis of organic phosphorus compounds fuel harmful cyanobacterial blooms in western Lake Erie?
    John's research combines remote sensing technologies with lab experiments to determine how internal nutrient loading fuels the blooms of potentially toxic cyanobacteria in western Lake Erie. This research is important as tens of thousands of people rely on Lake Erie for drinking water.
    Does enzymatic hydrolysis of organic phosphorus compounds fuel harmful cyanobacterial blooms in western Lake Erie?
    John's research combines remote sensing technologies with lab experiments to determine how internal nutrient loading fuels the blooms of potentially toxic cyanobacteria in western Lake Erie. This research is important as tens of thousands of people rely on Lake Erie for drinking water.